Christoph Lindner, College of Design

Christoph Lindner

cpl@uoregon.edu
Academic Areas:
Globalization, Contemporary Art and Architecture, Urban Studies, History of New York City, Urban Sustainability, Cinema and Popular Culture

Christoph Lindner is an expert in the impact of globalization on the space and communities of contemporary cities and can speak to the politics of urban pollution, ruin aesthetics, gentrification and street art, and the rise of elevated parks in cities such as New York and São Paulo. At the University of Oregon, he is dean of the College of Design. Lindner is also an honorary research professor in Cultural Analysis at the University of Amsterdam and was professor of Media and Culture there, where he launched and directed the Amsterdam School for Cultural Analysis Cities Project and served as founding director of the Netherlands Institute for Cultural Analysis. His research and writings span architecture, urban planning, design, art, visual culture, art history, and even James Bond.

Contact:
cpl@uoregon.edu | 541-346-3631 | @cplindner

Websites:
http://aaa.uoregon.edu
http://www.christophlindner.org

Recent Media:
Welcome to the City of Trump (Fast Company, Nov. 29, 2016)
The spy whom we loved: The enduring appeal of James Bond (a podcast conversation by Knowledge@Wharton, featuring Christoph Lindner, Nov. 12, 2015)
A brief, depressing history of the quest for a black James Bond (GQ, Oct. 31, 2015)
Imagining New York City: Literature, Urbanism and the Visual Arts, 1890-1940 (review of Christoph Lindner’s book in The Guardian, June 19, 2015; and by the Graham Foundation, no date available)
Rebel City Amsterdam: Reflections on the Occupied University (The New Metropolitan, March 16, 2015)
Will the image of James Bond ever be shaken, not stirred? (CBC, Sept. 4, 2015)
Smart phones are killing us (Salon.com, Nov. 2, 2013)
Only disconnect: Three cheers for boredom (The New Yorker, Oct. 28, 2013)
Amsterdam and New York: Transnational photographic exchange in the era of globalization (podcast of lecture at MIT, Feb. 10, 2011)