Greg Retallack, Department of Earth Sciences

Greg Retallack

gregr@uoregon.edu
Academic Areas:
Global Climate Change, Mass Extinctions, Major Evolutionary Transitions, Ancient Mars Environments, the Origin of Life

Greg Retallack is an expert in global climate change, mass extinctions, major evolutionary transitions, ancient Mars environments, and the origin of life. At the University of Oregon, he is a professor of earth sciences and the Director of Paleontological Collections at the Museum of Natural and Cultural History. Greg studies the evolution of life on land, and in particular, the evidence of fossil soils. His past studies have explored the role of soils in ape and human evolution in Kenya, grassland evolution in North America, and dinosaur extinction in Montana.

Contact:
gregr@uoregon.edu | 541-346-4558

Websites:  
http://blogs.uoregon.edu/gregr
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gregory_Retallack
http://scholar.google.com/citations?user=JkQdCJcAAAAJ&hl=en
http://natural-history.uoregon.edu/collections/web-galleries/retallack-collection-oregons-fossil-heritage

Recent Media:
Vinegar-like acid rain may have fallen during Earth’s worst extinction (Smithsonian Magazine, Jan. 21, 2015)
U.S. geologist discovers Earth-like soils on Mars (Sci-News.com, August 22, 2014)
'Fossilized' Martian soil hints at signs of life (GMA News Online, July 22, 2014)
VIDEO: Signs of life on Mars (University of Oregon, July 16, 2014)
Creatures of the Ediacaran (ScienceLine, March 14, 2014)
Land creatures might not have come from the sea (National Public Radio, Dec. 12, 2012)
Controversial claim puts life on land 65 million years early (Nature, Dec. 12, 2012)