Geri Richmond, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry

Geri Richmond, U.S. Science Envoy to Southeast Asia and expert in STEM career paths for women

Geraldine 'Geri' Richmond

richmond@uoregon.edu
Academic Areas:
Water and Water Resources, Environmental Sustainability, Global Science Engagement with the Developing World, STEM Education and Policy, Women in STEM

Geri is an expert in science, science policy, STEM and women in STEM. Geri has been at the forefront in the development of our understanding of the fundamental properties of surfaces relevant to global environmental and technological issues. She holds the University of Oregon Presidential Chair, is a professor of chemistry and serves as the U.S. State Department Science Envoy to the Lower Mekong Countries. She currently serves at the appointment of President Obama to the National Science Board and is the elected President of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Geri is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and is a Fellow of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the American Physical Society (APS) and the Association for Women in Science. Geri is the founding member and Director of the highly regarded COACh program that provides programs aimed at advancing the careers of women scientists and engineers in the U.S. and round the globe including developing countries in Africa, South America, the Middle East and Central and Southeast Asia.

Contact:
richmond@uoregon.edu | 541-346-4635

Websites:
http://richmondscience.uoregon.edu/
http://coach.uoregon.edu/

Recent Media:
To Advance Science, It's Time to Tackle Unconscious Bias (Live Science, June 9, 2016)
Global science engagement (Science Magazine, Jan. 29, 2016)
US Science Envoy sees tech potential in students (Voice of America, March 9, 2015)
AAAS can help its members build scientific partnerships in developing countries, says Geraldine Richmond (Science, Feb. 27, 2015)
Survey finds Americans largely optimistic about science (USA Today, April 21, 2014)
VIDEO: Geri Richmond: surf, sink or swim (Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition, March 1, 2014)