Greg Dotson, School of Law

Academic Areas:
Environmental and Natural Resources Law, Energy Law, Climate Change Law and Policy

Greg Dotson is an expert in energy and environmental law, particularly as they relate to climate change. At the University of Oregon, he is an assistant professor of law and a faculty member of the Environmental and Natural Resources Law Center, where he leads the Energy Law and Policy Project. Before joining the faculty in Oregon Law, Dotson served as the Vice President for Energy and Environmental Policy at the Washington, D.C.–based multidisciplinary think tank the Center for American Progress (CAP). Prior to that, he served as U.S. Rep. Henry A. Waxman’s lead energy and environmental policy staffer from 1996 until 2014. During his time on the Hill, he was the lead environmental policy staffer on numerous pieces of legislation including the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009. Greg was also engaged in congressional oversight and investigations, including numerous high-profile inquiries into political interference with climate science, the BP Deepwater Horizon disaster, hydraulic fracturing, and the energy market abuses of Enron.

Contact: gdotson@uoregon.edu | 541-346-9134

Websites:
http://law.uoregon.edu/explore/greg-dotson

Recent Media:
Why EPA’s U-turn on auto efficiency rules gives China the upper hand (The Conversation, March 29, 2018)
Industrial Strength: How the U.S. Government Hid Fracking’s Risks to Drinking Water (Inside Climate News, November 16, 2017).
After lawsuits, Trump administration enables highway emissions tracking program (CBS San Francisco Bay Area, Sept. 26, 2017)
OPINION: Oregon energy leadership in the aftermath of federal abdication (The Oregonian, June 4, 2017)
Oregon county seeks to block LNG project with ballot measure (Oregon Public Broadcasting, May 8, 2018)
Now under attack, EPA’s work on climate change has been going on for decades (The Conversation, March 9, 2017)
'Absurd' Entek pollution gag order more than meets the eye (The Oregonian, April, 21, 2017)