David Liebowitz, College of Education

David Liebowitz

daviddl@uoregon.edu
Academic Areas:
Education Inequality, School Leadership, Teacher Evaluation, School Improvement, Education Policy Analysis

David Liebowitz is an academic expert in education policy and school leadership. He studies the challenges facing schools with concentrations of traditionally under-served students and effective leadership strategies to address these challenges. At the University of Oregon, he is an assistant professor of education methodology, policy and leadership. His recent research focuses on topics such as teacher evaluation, school leadership, the effects of—and remedies to—racial and socio-economic segregation, and comprehensive school improvement initiatives. In partnership with the Oregon Department of Education, David is examining whether and how Oregon’s school principals influence students’ academic, attendance and disciplinary outcomes as well as their entry to and persistence in higher education. David is a former teacher and principal and a policy advisor at the state and international levels.

Contact: daviddl@uoregon.edu | 541-346-0914 | @DavidDLiebowitz

Websites:
www.daviddliebowitz.com
https://education.uoregon.edu/people/faculty/daviddl

Recent Media:
Insights on How Principals Can Affect Teachers, Students and Schools (The Wallace Foundation Blog, Oct. 16, 2019) 
COE research helps bilingual children find classroom success (Around the O, July 29, 2019)
‘Do You Support Busing?’ Is Not the Best Question (The New York Times, July 6, 2019)
Did busing for school desegregation succeed? Here’s what research says. (Chalkbeat, July 1, 2019)
OCDE ‘olha’ para as escolas portuguesas: Aprendizagem e taxa de adesão é quase universal (Jornal Económico, Dec. 6, 2018)
OCDE recomenda mudanças nas regras de colocação de professores nas escolas e na sua avaliação (Público, Dec. 6, 2018)
OCDE. Portugal deveria apostar na reforma antecipada de professores sem penalizações (Observador, Dec. 6, 2018)
How Segregation Impedes Graduation: New Research to Know (Education Week, Oct. 30, 2017)
When school districts resegregate, more black and Hispanic students drop out. (Chalkbeat, Aug. 28, 2017)