Elizabeth Tippett, School of Law

Elizabeth Tippett

tippett@uoregon.edu
Academic Areas:
Employment Law, Behavioral Ethics, Decision Making

Elizabeth Tippett studies behavioral ethics, employment law and decision-making. Her recent research examined how employee timekeeping software can erode compliance with wage and hour laws, and she has studied how contract terms may predict a company’s litigation risk. Tippett is also studying drug injury ads, through which attorneys recruit consumers for lawsuits against pharmaceutical companies. Although these ads contain strong warning about medical risks, deceptive content in those ads remains largely unregulated. She is a co-author of the fifth edition of the textbook "Employment Discrimination & Employment Law: The Field as Practiced," and her research on disparate impact litigation has been cited in opinions issued by the U.S. Court of Appeals and Iowa Supreme Court. Her writing has appeared in the New Republic, Slate and The Daily Beast, and she has appeared on the BBC, Sirius Satellite Radio and Oregon Public Radio. In June 2017, Tippett testified before the House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution and Civil Justice, regarding mass tort advertising.

Contact: tippett@uoregon.edu | 541-346-8938

Websites:
https://law.uoregon.edu/explore/elizabeth-tippett
https://blogs.uoregon.edu/liztippett/

Recent Media: 
The State We’re In: Sexual Harassment Laws (WAMU, Oct. 30, 2018)
Kavanaugh confirmation a reminder: Accused sexual harassers get promoted anyway (The Conversation, Sept. 28, 2018)
Consumers are misled by some mass tort drug injury ads: new academic study (Reuters, Sept. 24, 2018)
Nike announces pay increases for 7,000 employees (CNN, July 23, 2018)
When unpaid training doesn’t feel voluntary at all (The New York Times, June 8, 2018)
Employees say time-tracking systems chip away at their paychecks (The Wall Street Journal, May 20, 2018)
Workers are losing billions of dollars because of time theft (National Public Radio, May 18, 2018)
Pay Equity (Oregon Public Broadcasting, April 16, 2018)
Lawyers keep secrets locked up – so they get asked to do the dirty work (The Conversation, April 12, 2018)
Sinclair-style employment contracts that require payment for quitting are very uncommon. Here’s why (The Conversation, April 5, 2018)
Sexual harassment training's #metoo moment (NBC Left Field, Feb. 7, 2018)
Power Pinch (National Public Radio, Dec. 4, 2017)
Commentary: Why Matt Lauer’s mega-contract couldn’t save him (Fortune, Nov. 30, 2017)
Why sexual harassment training doesn’t work (BBC, Nov. 22, 2017)
#MeToo in the workplace (Oregon Public Broadcasting, Think Out Loud, Nov. 22, 2017)
Companies need confidentiality clauses – but not to muzzle sexual abuse victims (The Conversation, Nov. 21, 2017)
This is what smart workplace harassment training looks like (Moneyish, Nov. 6, 2017)
How workplace sexual harassment training has and hasn’t changed (Salon, Oct. 19, 2017)
Why Trump’s tirades are losing their potency (The Conversation, Sept. 20, 2017)
What are some risks of being a whistleblower? (KJZZ, March 16, 2017)
Uber’s dismissive treatment of sexism is all too typical in corporate america (The Washington Post, Feb. 23, 2017)
Donald Trump's conflicts of interest leave him vulnerable (Time Magazine, Jan. 21, 2017)
How timekeeping software helps companies nickel and dime their workers (The Conversation, Jan. 11, 2017)