Erin Moore, School of Architecture & Environment

Academic Areas:
Architecture, Sustainability in Architecture

Erin Moore is an academic expert in architecture and sustainability in architecture. At the University of Oregon, she is the head of the School of Architecture & Environment and an associate professor of architecture. Erin focuses on the ecological context of buildings. Her teaching, research, and creative practice focuses on the life-cycle environmental context of building construction and on the ways that buildings shape and reflect cultural constructions of nature. Recent work explores the architectural space of fossil fuel consumption, biogenic carbon sequestration, and climate change. 

In the face of serious global challenges, Erin believes that it is especially important to develop aggressive, creative innovators who can connect the power of design with good science and rigorous ethical thinking. In her own teaching, she works to bring together processes of design and innovation with the science of sustainability in collaborations with chemists, ecologists, and biologists.

Contact: moore2@uoregon.edu | 541-346-1439 

Websites:
https://floatwork.com
https://archenvironment.uoregon.edu/architecture/erin-moore

Recent Media:
Inside Out (College of Design, April 1, 2019)
Erin Moore named the new Head of the University of Oregon's School of Architecture & Environment (Archinect, July 2, 2018)
15 Outdoor Kitchens That Inspire Al Fresco Dining (Dwell, May 4, 2018)
Pair of tiny dwellings built on solidified lava in Hawaii (New Atlas, Dec. 11, 2017)
Inspiring home of the week: Hawaiian cabin built on a 300-year-old lava formation (Independent, Dec. 1, 2017)
Twin modern cabins help nurture a close relationship with nature (Treehugger, Nov. 27, 2017)
Hawaiian cabins by Erin Moore are designed for life outdoors (Dezeen, Nov. 18, 2017)
A&AA prof discusses designing from nature on UO Today (Around the O, March 23, 2017)
From the home front: Watershed writing studio; build a tiny house at McMinnville workshop (The Oregonian, April 9, 2013)