Leif Karlstrom, Department of Earth Sciences

Leif Karlstrom

Practice Areas: Volcanoes, Glaciers, Surface Processes, Fluid Mechanics, Geodynamics

Leif Karlstrom is an academic expert in volcanoes, glaciers, geomorphology, fluid mechanics and geodynamics. At the University of Oregon, he is an associate professor of earth sciences. Active volcanic projects include the eruption cycle, magma flow pathways in the crust, flood basalts, the interpretation of volcanic seismicity and landscape evolution in volcanic environments. Glaciological interests include the dynamics and pathways of water movement through glaciers and ice sheets. 

Contact: leif@uoregon.edu | 505-977-3482 | @VolcanoListener

Website:
https://pages.uoregon.edu/leif/
https://earthsciences.uoregon.edu/profile/leif/

Recent Media:
PODCAST: National Parks Traveler Episode 181: Musical Kīlauea (National Parks Traveler, July 31, 2022)
Volcanic Lava Lake Belts Out Its Secrets in Seismic “Songs” (EOS, July 15, 2022)
A volcano's song could contain clues to its future eruptions, scientists hope (National Public Radio, June 6, 2022)
The weird musical dynamics of a lava lake on Kilauea volcano (Around the O, June 6, 2022)
‘Singing’ lava lakes could help predict when volcanoes will blow (Science Magazine, June 1, 2022)
Special Report: Experts say we will see another volcanic eruption in the Cascades in our lifetime (KEZI, Dec. 23, 2021)
Curious: All Those OTHER Volcanoes In The Cascades (Jefferson Pubic Radio, Nov. 6, 2020)
It hasn't always been so quiet for Cascade volcanoes (Discover, Aug. 25, 2020)
Cascade Range has nearly 3,000 once-active volcanoes, UO researchers find (The Oregonian, Aug. 23, 2020)
Study shows what’s below ‘recent’ Cascade eruptions (Around the O, Aug. 14, 2020)
Oregon researcher makes music from volcano sounds (KGW, Oct. 30, 2019)
Volcanologist jams to the beat of the Earth's drummer (Around the O, Oct. 25, 2019)
Karlstrom receives 2018 Hisashi Kuno Award (Earth & Space Science News, Nov. 29, 2018)
The Earth burped lava after being smashed by a dinosaur-killing asteroid (CBC Radio, Feb. 16, 2018)
More bad news for dinosaurs: Chicxulub meteorite impact triggered global volcanic eruptions on the ocean floor (The Conversation, Feb. 7, 2018)
That dinosaur-killing asteroid also triggered massive magma releases beneath the ocean, study finds (Los Angeles Times, Feb. 7, 2018)
Research: El Capitan holds the history of volcanic plumbing (Around the O, July 10, 2017)