Paul Slovic, Department of Psychology

Academic Areas:

Paul Slovic is an expert in human judgment, decision making, and risk perception. At the University of Oregon, he is a professor of psychology and president of Decision Research. Paul studies the psychology of risk and perceptions of risks. His most recent research examines psychological factors contributing to apathy toward genocide.

Contact: pslovic@uoregon.edu | 541-485-2400

Websites:
http://psychology.uoregon.edu/profile/pslovic/
www.decisionresearch.org

Recent Media:
A year after Aylan Kurdi’s tragic death, the world is still numb to the Syrian refugee crisis (Quartz, Sept. 2, 2016)
Where science ends and the GMO debate really begins (The Epoch Times, Aug. 22, 2016)
Climate change is genocide for island nations (The Register-Guard, July 31, 2016)
The arithmetic of compassion (The New York Times, Dec. 4, 2015)
Processing tragedy on a massive scale (WBEZ, Nov.19, 2015)
The huge paradox at the heart of how people think about environmental risks (The Washington Post, Nov. 4, 2015)
Why you don't really care about the next 'big one' (CityLab, July 21, 2015)
Why Charlie Hebdo gets more attention than Boko Haram (TIME, Jan. 15, 2015)
10 things you want to know about human nature if you’re fighting climate change (Grist, June 10, 2015)
Why your brain wants to help one child in need — but not millions (National Public Radio, Nov. 5, 2014)
Yes, our Ebola freakout is irrational. But there’s still a good reason to have the jitters. (The Washington Post, Oct. 27, 2015)
The psychology behind our collective Ebola freak-out (TIME, Oct. 20, 2014)
Experts offer steps for avoiding public hysteria, a different contagious threat (The New York Times, Oct. 15, 2014)
Becoming compassionately numb (The New York Times, Oct. 1, 2011)